Serving Clients Throughout New Jersey

November

Blog Posts in November, 2014

  • What is Megan's Law?

    In New Jersey, Megan's Law was originally signed into law on Oct. 31, 1994, requiring those convicted of sex offenses to register and setting community notification standards for the areas in which convicted sex offenders reside. The law was broadened to include mandatory Internet registration when a new portion was signed into law on July 31, 2001. Since that time, people convicted of certain sex ...
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  • New Jersey substitute teacher charged with sexual assault

    A 21-year-old woman who works as a substitute teacher has been accused of sexual assault. The woman faces several charges for sex crimes after an alleged incident that occurred on Nov. 20 in Wayne, New Jersey. Charges were filed the following day after a special victims unit investigated the incident. According to the principal of the high school where the woman was substituting, she was not ...
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  • Possible defenses to NJ lewdness charges

    The freedom of expression and the ability to do as one pleases without interference from government are rights enjoyed by residents of New Jersey and other communities throughout the United States. These rights are not, however, without limitation. Society prohibits people from engaging in acts of indecency such as lewdness that might be observed by other people. Lewdness in New Jersey occurs when ...
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  • Man charged with DWI after car chase with police

    New Jersey police claim that a man from Roselle led them on a car chase on Nov. 3 that resulted in a series of moving violations and the detention of all four individuals in the vehicle. After a brief investigation, the other three occupants were released, and the driver was taken to Garwood Police Headquarters to face charges of DWI and other crimes. According to the police, they first made ...
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  • What is sexual assault?

    Under New Jersey law, sexual assault is considered a serious crime. An individual who is convicted of this offense could face severe sanctions such as a long term in prison. Depending on the circumstances of a case, an individual could be charged with sexual assault, which is a second-degree offense. However, if penetration occurred, the accused person might be charged with aggravated sexual ...
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  • 2 New Jersey men accused of running heroin mill

    On Oct. 30, two people in New Jersey were detained for allegedly operating a heroin mill. The 30-year-old and 29-year-old men were apprehended at a home in Hackensack, and they were both charged with money laundering and maintaining a drug facility. Police also charged one of the men for allegedly using somebody else's personal information. After the men were taken into custody, officers executed ...
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  • Money laundering is well defined under New Jersey Law

    Like many states, New Jersey regards money laundering as a serious crime, and the penalties for being found guilty are well enumerated. Different kinds of illegal financial activity all have their own punishment schemes and frameworks. With offenses like money laundering, the degree of a person's charges depend on the amount of money allegedly involved, but numerous factors could play a part in a ...
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  • What is the court process for a juvenile offender?

    When a minor is accused with a juvenile offense, he or she can expect his or her case to follow a specific procedure as it moves through the juvenile justice court system. The procedure and timelines governing it are set by statutory laws in New Jersey. Following a juvenile's arrest, he or she will typically have a detention hearing within 24 hours. The purpose of this hearing is for the juvenile ...
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  • New Jersey penalties for refusing a breath test

    If a law enforcement officer has probable cause to take an individual into custody for drinking and driving, it is implied that the individual has consented to a breath test. However, an individual cannot be forced to submit to a breath test. While a person can refuse a breath test, he or she will face legal penalties. Additional refusals will result in stricter penalties. The first time a person ...
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